Building Trust after Trust is Broken

trust

Picture this: You’ve had concerns brought to you about the diversity and inclusion within your agency.  Some of the concerns run deep; they may even be open wounds and you know you need to address them.  You’ve gotten people to the table to talk, even those who felt reluctant to share, people who may have wondered aloud, “Are you really going to do something about this, this time?” or “How are you going to be any different from the last one [director/officer]?” You’re committed, you’re resolute… and you’re a little nervous.  Where do you go from here?

One of the very first steps is to establish trust among and between your committee members.  That’s not an easy task if people have had negative experiences with your organization or with past failed initiatives.  Choosing the right person to facilitate the process is important – s/he needs to have enough authority and influence within the organization to effect changes and commit the organization to them, be steadfastly dedicated to diversity and inclusion, be a respectful communicator and skilled conflict negotiator, and be open and willing to learn from committee members.  If outside facilitators and consultants are chosen to serve in this role, then the committee will still need someone of organizational authority to participate on the committee in a leadership role to ensure commitment to making changes.

When Affirmations formed its Multicultural Advisory Committee, it was designed to address a recent transgression that was rooted in a history loaded with structural and geographic racial inequality.  Those who came to the table were reasonably skeptical of the outcome of any planning meetings.  Trust was a difficult thing to establish.

Everyone’s heard the old phrase, “he can talk the talk, but does he walk the walk?”  Is it all talk, or is there any action behind those words?   In Jocelyn Giangrande’s book “What’s in Your Sandwich?” she interviews Bob Riney, President and Chief Operating Officer of Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan.  When asked about reputation, he said, “to rebuild a tarnished reputation, it requires 100% ownership.  It helps to go public, stand up and apologize by admitting wrongdoing… it requires your reputation to be more consistent.”

A key element here is “go public, stand up and apologize by admitting wrongdoing.”  So many leaders within organizations refuse to acknowledge any role in creating the circumstances that led to the transgressions.  Paralyzed by fear, public admonishment, and perhaps possible legal recourse, they skip this step and move right into action planning. They avoid taking responsibility and consequently damage their ability to build trust within the community.  In some cases this is a fatal flaw in the process.

Have you ever felt like someone wronged you?  Have you had someone make an honest mistake but with good intentions?  Ultimately, you just want someone to own that.  To say, “Yes, this was wrong.  I did this and let’s make a plan to change it for the future.”

When Affirmations’ Multicultural Advisory Committee began to meet, the pain among community members was palpable.  People needed to be able to voice their hurt, have that pain heard and have leadership acknowledge the truthfulness of that experience.  The committee planned an off-site gathering, in a community member’s comfortable living room, with a potluck-style meal.  For three hours, people shared their hurts and their experiences and Affirmations’ leadership acknowledge the reality and truthfulness of those experiences.

Sitting with people and hearing their lived experiences provides one of the best solid foundations upon which to build.  The fears and pain are real and when fully understood by those in leadership, can provide a substantive base to inspire next steps that are thoughtful, caring and relevant to the concerns that are being shared.  It was only the first stage of building a solid trust base within the Multicultural Advisory Committee at Affirmations – there would be many more to come. But without a solid base, all future efforts would be weak.  This early step in Affirmations’ process was critical in creating an environment of mutual respect, caring and honesty and set the stage for even deeper, equally as honest conversations about transparency and accountability that would come up in future meetings.

Read Part 5: What Does Getting From Committment from the Top Look Like?

____________________________________________________________

This is one post in a multi-part story documenting one historically white organization’s journey toward becoming racially inclusive.  The series seeks to document the challenges and successes faced along the way in an effort to provide a learning tool for other nonprofit organizations who wish to do the same.  For a complete copy of Affirmations’ “Blueprint for Change” visit www.GoAffirmations.org and click on About Us.

Kathleen LaTosch at NCRC Annual Conference 2012 
 
Kathleen LaTosch is a consultant specializing in diversity and inclusion planning for nonprofit organizations.  She worked at Affirmations, Michigan’s largest LGBT organization, from 2002-2011 and served as Chief Administrative Officer from 2007-2011.  While there, she was responsible for facilitating a broad-based racial diversity and inclusion initiative.  For more information about Kathleen’s work and availability, email her at klatosch at gmail.com

How to Create a Plan for Racial Inclusiveness: One Nonprofit Story

Questions and Answers signpostThis is part one in a multi-part series documenting the story of one historically white organization’s journey toward becoming racially inclusive.  The series seeks to document the challenges and successes on the road toward racial inclusion in an effort to provide a resource for other nonprofit organizations who wish to do the same.  This first part is designed to give a brief snapshot of the entire timeline with subsequent editions delving more deeply into each step of the process (11-7-2013).

Forward by David Antonio Garcia, Executive Director of Affirmations  This past Saturday I attended an Affirmations’ Board Retreat. As I looked around the room, I saw a tremendously diverse group of board members. The Affirmations’ Board of Directors is a beautiful mix of diversity and a true representation of our vast LGBT community. The Board consists of transgender members, straight allies, people of color, seniors, varying social economic backgrounds and much more. The current staff at Affirmations is also representative of this diversity from the top down. There are currently five director level positions at the Center and of those 5 positions, two are held by people of color, two by women, and our current Fund Development Director is a straight female ally. Having a diverse board and staff is not simply the right thing to do, it is the best way forward. The organization is profoundly changed, grateful, and stronger because of the work done by so many. It is not enough to simply talk about the importance of a diverse culture, you must live it to truly understand its inherent value. We are not perfect but we are improved. We are not finished but we are better.” (11-6-2013)

How to Create a Plan for Racial Inclusiveness: One Nonprofit Story

By Kathleen LaTosch

 Black employees say racism played part in Affirmations shakeupread the newspaper headline on October 12, 2006.  The article reported on the exit of two black staff members from Michigan’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community center, based outside of Detroit, Michigan.  The circumstances surrounding the two staff members leaving the organization reopened historic wounds within the region’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community and sparked the formation of picket-style protests, letters to the editor, and boycotting of services.  It was also the catalyst that drove the agency to embark upon what would end up being a multi-year racial inclusiveness initiative.

How it began. The process formally began in 2007 after a heated meeting between community members and organizational leadership.  At that meeting, LGBT people of color met with an all-white group of Affirmations leaders and shared a comprehensive and proactive list of recommendations for the organization to become racially inclusive.   Following the meeting, a small group of board and staff members gathered together to take a closer look at the circumstances leading to the incident, explored the long-standing historical context within which it took place, and began to seek varied and vocal community perspectives.  By 2008, the committee had determined that Affirmations needed to form a quasi-independent “Multicultural Advisory Committee” (MAC) tasked with creating a set of best-practices to address racial diversity and inclusion. 

Getting the right people.  The committee, made up largely of non-staff, non-board community members of color, was offered the opportunity to do culture-changing work with full support of the board of directors. The MAC began meeting twice per month and would continue to meet at least monthly throughout the duration of its existence, maintaining and limiting participation to two staff and two board members at all times plus one coordinator in order to maximize community input and participation.  The racial balance of the committee, until the last year when the committee was coming to a close (and new members were no longer sought to replace outgoing members), maintained a white minority to enhance the relevancy, quality and integrity of the process and eventual outcomes.

Doing the work. By 2009, the committee had pledged to do the work at a very detailed level, leaving no stone unturned and documenting the entire process so that it could be used as a learning tool for other organizations.  Two years later, in 2011, the MAC completed the “Blueprint for Change” and forwarded it to the Affirmations’ Board of Directors for legal review and adoption.  With a subsequent reading and minor revisions, the plan was fully adopted and formally worked into the organization’s strategic plan in the fall of 2012.

MAC coverMonitoring progress.  Once released to the public, a formal MAC2 was formed – the Multicultural Advisory Compliance Committee.  The committee, chaired by people of color community leaders, was tasked with monitoring Affirmation’s progress in meeting the objectives outlined in the Blueprint for Change.  This winter, 2013, Affirmations will be releasing its first report on work toward meeting those objectives.   The full plan is available online at Affirmations’ website: http://www.goaffirmations.org/?page=about_us.

This is one post in a multi-part story documenting one historically white organization’s journey toward becoming racially inclusive.  The series seeks to document the challenges and successes faced along the way in an effort to provide a learning tool for other nonprofit organizations who wish to do the same.  For a complete copy of Affirmations’ “Blueprint for Change” visit www.GoAffirmations.org and click on About Us.Kathleen LaTosch at NCRC Annual Conference 2012 

Read Part 2 here.

 
Kathleen LaTosch is a consultant specializing in diversity and inclusion planning for nonprofit organizations.  She worked at Affirmations, Michigan’s largest LGBT organization, from 2002-2011 and served as Chief Administrative Officer from 2007-2011.  While there, she was responsible for facilitating a broad-based racial diversity and inclusion initiative.  For more information about Kathleen’s work and availability, email her at klatosch at gmail.com